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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 134 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 14 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 1 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 10 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 10 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 8 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stafford Court House (Virginia, United States) or search for Stafford Court House (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1861., [Electronic resource], A Bostonian's view of affairs in Charleston. (search)
e secession of the Gulf States, a clear majority, that body, Black Republican as it is, passed three Territorial bills, from all of which the Wilmot Proviso was excluded; and more than this, a provision was engrafted in each of them that all rights of property should be determined by the principles and proceedings of the common law — provisions that open up the Territories to every citizen of the Union that shall choose to carry his slaves thither. The Black Republicans, as his friend from Stafford so delights, with peculiar emphasis, to call them, have themselves surrendered, given up the Wilmot Proviso. And had the Cotton States remained in the Union, could this Black Republican party, with its minority of twenty-one in one house and eight in the other, have ever applied the Wilmot Proviso to the Territories that belong to us all,"share and share alike? " No law, then, has been passed applying the Wilmot Proviso.-- Has any been enacted abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia
e by striking out that portion of the first resolution by which the Governor was authorized to order out such portion of the "militia of the State as he may deem necessary," and the question being on agreeing thereto, Mr. Seddon obtained the floor, and proceeded to answer the argument advanced by Messrs. Robertson and Segar, which he did at length, taking the Southern State-Rights view of the questions now agitating the public mind. Mr. Segar replied by correcting his friend from Stafford in relation to his misconceived views of his position. Mr. Kern obtained the floor, and commenced an argument against Collier's last proposition to strike out, which he continued for four hours, with many interruptions and calls to order. A call of the House being agreed on, several hours were consumed in calling the roll. The doors were locked, and the Sergeant-at-Arms dispatched after absentees, the members in the meantime amusing themselves in talking and other innocent amusem
f property should be determined by the principles and proceedings of the common law — provisions that open up the Territories to every citizen of the Union that shall choose to carry his slaves thither. The Black Republicans, as his friend from Stafford so delights, with peculiar emphasis, to call them, have themselves surrendered, given up the Wilmot Proviso. And had the Cotton States remained in the Union, could this Black Republican party, with its minority of twenty-one in one house and eioor, and proceeded to answer the argument advanced by Messrs. Robertson and Segar, which he did at length, taking the Southern State-Rights view of the questions now agitating the public mind. Mr. Segar replied by correcting his friend from Stafford in relation to his misconceived views of his position. Mr. Kern obtained the floor, and commenced an argument against Collier's last proposition to strike out, which he continued for four hours, with many interruptions and calls to order.