hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,057 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 106 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 72 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 70 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 67 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 58 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 17, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for George Washington or search for George Washington in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

rolina seizing her forts was received here with the greatest delight. [Second Dispatch.] The Blockade — Troops Pouring In — The Fleet Sailed for New York. Charleston,April 16.--The Federal fleet outside stopped three inward bound vessels last evening--one bearing the Spanish, one the British, and the other the American flag.--They were detained a short time and then allowed to proceed. The fleet has determined to interfere with no more vessels until orders are received from Washington. later. Troops continue to pour in from all parts of the State. Half disciplined, as many of them are, they undergo rigid drills. It is estimated that 10,000 soldiers are now in and about the city. Three regiments are encamped at the Race Course, and two at Pikesville, three miles beyond. General Beauregard is very active, and is strengthening every position in the harbor and on the land. He has offers of regiments from Alabama and Georgia; but Carolinian are so eager to
,April 16. --The steamship Philadelphia is rapidly loading with guns and munitions, and may carry troops South. She is nearly ready for sea. A meeting of citizens was held to-day, and arrangements were made for a public meeting to sustain the Government. The Seventh and Eighth Regiments hold themselves in readiness for service. A number of volunteer companies will be formed.--Gen. Ward, of the Scott Life Guard, is expected to assist in the organization. The Regiment of Col. Bennett, in Brooklyn, say they will support the Government to a man. Orders have been received from Washington to fill up the Federal Regiments as speedily as possible. The recruiting offices are crowded with applicants. The Second Regiment, of New Jersey, will tender their services to the Government.--About six hundred Wide Awakes, it is said, will do the same. It is stated that Gov. Alden, of New Jersey, will in a few days tender to the Federal authorities several thousand troops.
Rebels and traitors. This is the common epithet bestowed by the Lincoln press upon the people of the seceded States. The same title was applied by the British and Tories in the Revolution to our ancestors. Even George Washington was styled the "rebel leader, Mr. Washington." It took the "rebels" some time to teach the tones good manners, but they succeeded at last; nor do we despair altogether of improving the Republican mode of speech, and that at no distant day. George the Third neveWashington was styled the "rebel leader, Mr. Washington." It took the "rebels" some time to teach the tones good manners, but they succeeded at last; nor do we despair altogether of improving the Republican mode of speech, and that at no distant day. George the Third never perpetrated a thousandth part of the wrongs against the which Lincoln meditates against the Southern States, and there is no other difference between the two tyrants, except that the one was a gentleman and the other is a
w regular, old-line Federalists, the secession feeling is predominant. The "war news" has had a good effect, and the news of the shedding of the first drop of blood at Sumter cemented our people, and Rockingham is ready to "let slip the dogs of war." The mountaineer, schooled to the use of the rifle from boyhood, makes his mark in the conflict, and are never subdued. The mountain passes of Virginia can defy the myrmidons of Abe Lincoln to the crack of doom. This is the section where Washington cast his eye for men to raise a bleeding country from the dust, in the days of the Revolution; and the defenders of American liberty (the Southern people) may look to us again to repel tyranny, (the North,) and not look in vain. We are ready. This morning another flag of the Southern Confederacy floats from the Exchange Hotel, 15 feet by 11 feet, in place of the first one put up, which has become faded by the rains.--This new flag has seven stars in the circle, and the eighth (Virgin