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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 7, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1100 AD or search for 1100 AD in all documents.

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gade from Wheeling, who commanded a "Union" regiment of congenial cut throats was so lucky as to end his ignoble life in the union. Dispatches to Northern papers represent him as an errant coward, and seem to rejoice that the chances of battle have obviated the necessity of his future appearance on any active field. Another account received differs somewhat from the above. It says that the Virginia forces were under Col.Porterfield, and contained of 300 men) that they were attacked by 1100 or 1500) of the enemy, and repulsed them three times, our men remaining masters of the ground Eight of our men were killed, among others Col. Porterfield himself, and Mr. Thos E. Simms, of the Commissary Department. There were between fifty and sixty of the enemy Rilled. While we regret the loss of valuable men in an encounter with so ignoble and depraved an enemy as they had to contend against in this instance, we must enter our decided protest against the easy manner in which it appea