Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 22, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hicks or search for Hicks in all documents.

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ompact by ourselves; and as affording justification to themselves, to the world and to posterity, for the destruction of the most perfect and prosperous government which the Providence of God has ever permitted the wisdom of man to devise. Gov. Hicks, of Maryland, on an extra session. Gov. Hicks, of Maryland, has written another letter in reply to one asking him to call an extra session of the Legislature. He says: After allowing a reasonable time for action on the part of the NorGov. Hicks, of Maryland, has written another letter in reply to one asking him to call an extra session of the Legislature. He says: After allowing a reasonable time for action on the part of the Northern States, if they shall neglect or refuse to observe the plain requirements of the Constitution, then, in my judgment, we shall be fully warranted in demanding a division of the country. We shall have done our duty to the Constitution, to the memory of our fathers, to ourselves and posterity, and the South can honorably take such steps as patriotism and honor may demand either in or out of the Union. No one will then be more ready or willing than I to follow the fortunes of the South, but
Position of Maryland. Baltimore, Dec. 21. --A correspondence between Gov. Hicks and A. R. Handy, Commissioner from Mississippi, appears in the American of to-morrow. The latter inquires whether the Governor will convene the Legislature for the purpose of co-operating with Mississippi in measures necessary to defend the rights of the South, and to form a new Confederacy? The Governor replies at some length, that Maryland is identified with the Southern States in feeling, institutions and habits; that she is also conservative and devoted to the Union of the States under the Constitution, and her people will use all honorable means to preserve and perpetuate it.-- He declares the sentiment of the people of his State is almost unanimous to uphold the Union and maintain their rights under it.--They believe their rights will yet be admitted and secured, and that not until it is certain they will be respected no longer — not until every honorable, constitutional and lawful ef