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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Rip Winkle or search for Rip Winkle in all documents.

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tol — others crashed like a musket — others roared like a six-pounder — and some of them might rival the explosion of the big gun at Old Point. The night was one of the longest of the year, according to the almanac. According to our feelings, it was longer than any ever experienced at the North pole. We thought over everything we had ever heard of in the way of heavy slumbers. We thought of the seven sleepers, and their little siesta of one hundred and eighty years. We thought of Rip Van Winkle, and his inferior performance of fourteen. We seemed to have been abed longer than either of them, and we did not feel altogether assured that we had not been asleep the whole time. We were by no means certain — if we were asleep — that we should not wake in the middle of the thirtieth century.--Day, however, came at last, and will come, in the end, though the night be an hundred years long. Day came, but with it ceased not the sounds that made night hideous. They seemed, indeed,