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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 539 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 88 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 58 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 54 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 54 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 39 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 38 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 26, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Americans or search for Americans in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

ll be decisive of the war. If we are beaten at that point, is there any Northerner who proposes to give up the contest? If the South are beaten, is there any probability that Southerners will yield the contest any more than we would? They are Americans, blood of our blood, our brothers, cousins, friends — and they reason, think and feel just as we should under similar circumstances. There is, therefore, little hope of an end of the war by a decisive battle or a short campaign. Another pe were many such in all the ceded States. But the attempt at coercion by arms has carried them nearly all over for the present. Is there a sane American who believes that any amount of physical force will ever prevail to make Union men out of Americans who don't choose to be such?--Can you starve them into it? Is there the remotest hope that a long war will make friends out of enemies? So long as the North stands where it stood six months ago, and says to the South, "you must yield, back do
The Confederate Commissioners in France. The Paris correspondent of the London Star writes, June 6th: "The ministers of the United States have hardly left Paris when the agents of the Confederate States make their appearance. Mr. William Rost has arrived, charged with an extraordinary message from President Davis to the Emperor of the French. Many Americans — It is hard to divine why they venture such an assertion — say that the Southern envoy and his friends are very sanguine as to the ultimate success of his mission. Mr. Rost is accompanied by several other gentlemen, some of whom set out immediately for St Peters burg, Prussia and Austria; and others try and engage on their side the sympathies of the manufacturers of France. Nothing is said about the Manchester men, in connection with this new mission; but it may fall strangely on English ears to be told that most of the slave-owners staying at Paris appear to be under the impression that some of these days English