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without which it was deemed possible to keep the Government on foot. On the 5th of March, the present incumbent's first full day in office, a letter from Major Anderson, commanding at Fort Sumter, written on the 28th of February, and received at the War Department on the 4th of March, was by that Department placed in his hand00 good and well-disciplined men. This opinion was concurred in by all the officers of his command, and their memoranda on the subject were made enclosures of Major Anderson's letter. The whole was immediately laid before Lieutenant General Scott, who at once concurred with General Anderson in opinion. On reflection, howeverGeneral Anderson in opinion. On reflection, however, he took full time, consulting with officers both of the Army and Navy, and at the end of four days came reluctantly but decidedly to the same conclusion as before. He also stated at the same time last no such sufficient force was then at the control of the Government, or could be raised and brought on the ground within the time
ormation relative to the troops of North Carolina, a portion of which we copy: We learn that President Davis has consented to receive, in addition to the four regiments already in the field, the 5th, 6th and 11th Regiments of Volunteers. The 5th arrived in Virginia a few days ago. The 6th, Col. Lee's, was to have left yesterday, and the 11th, rendezvoused at Danville, will receive marching orders for Richmond as soon as certificates of the election of the field officers are received at headquarters. The Sixth Regiment State Troops, Col. Fisher, is expected to leave on Monday. The Second, Col. Tew; the Third, Col. Meares, and the Fourth, Col. Anderson, are full and only await some slight equipments to take up their line of march. The Fifth, Col. McRue, is nearly completed, and the right wing will probably leave early next week. When these troops get to their destination, North Carolina will probably have in the field, at home and in Virginia, some twenty thousand men.
Col. Anderson at Loretto Springs. --Col. Anderson is now stopping at Loretto Springs., a watering place on the Alleghany mountains five miles from Cresson Station on the Pennsylvania Central Railroad. It is his intention to remain there until his health is entirely re-established. Col. Anderson at Loretto Springs. --Col. Anderson is now stopping at Loretto Springs., a watering place on the Alleghany mountains five miles from Cresson Station on the Pennsylvania Central Railroad. It is his intention to remain there until his health is entirely re-established.
ed out by his downfall in the path of duty than that he you love should shrink from the conflict. And this is the impulse of every true female heart — to shed proud tears over a fallen hero rather than embrace the loved one living with the brand of coward upon his brow. During the days of the battle, poor Clara watched the conflict from the battery, and scarcely did more than breathe. She shed no tear, but the deep melancholy of her eyes and the shuddering which shook her frame, when Anderson's cannon were belching forth their venom, showed the agony of her heart, and when repeated messages came assuring friends that their loved ones were safe, she yet teared to fill the bright angel hope to her heart, but when she could really no longer doubt the mouth of the blessed tidings, the reaction, after the great excitement she had undergone, seemed to have turned her to a marble statue. I was with Clara again on the happy day on which the Confederate flag was hoisted on Fort Sumt