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erent in man for sufficient cause; and that is what the South maintains at this time, in opposition to the sophistries of Seward. The proposition of North and Seward holds good only this far, that the right of Secession does not exist for insuffSeward holds good only this far, that the right of Secession does not exist for insufficient causes. It is only the abuse of the power that is unlawful. If Seward had confined his denial to the abuse of the right of Secession, what he has said against it would have been true, and the fallacy of his argument consists in ignoring the Seward had confined his denial to the abuse of the right of Secession, what he has said against it would have been true, and the fallacy of his argument consists in ignoring the distinction between the abuse of the right and the right itself. The fathers of the country felt it incumbent upon them to declare to the world the causes which impelled them to the separation. In that declaration was implied the admission that unlished it. George Third denied the right, whether supported or not supported by cause; and Lincoln, at the bidding of Seward, blindly adopts his language and his doctrines in all their untenable and long-repudiated latitude. But, fortunately fo