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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 15 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fagan or search for Fagan in all documents.

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losion of shells in the boxes of a burnt artillery carriage on the field, which suggested the return of the enemy to surprise us. The drivers put whip to their horses and rushed precipitately at the height of, their speed past our reserve forces, proclaiming the cause of the sudden running away to be a pursuit by the enemy. Did our reserve forces become affected by the panic? On the contrary, there stood Gen. Holmes' Brigade, consisting of Col. Bate's Walker Legion, Tennessee Volunteers, Col. Fagan's 1st Arkansas Regiment, and Captain Walker's Rifle Artillery unmoved by the general panic which had seized upon the teamsters, and instead of imitating their retreat, clamored for a forward movement to meet the imaginary pursuers. Such is the contrast between the effect of a flight of teamsters upon the vandal invaders from the North and a similar incident upon our brave soldiers. The one is quick to emulate the example of the panic-stricken wagon drivers; the other but derives new