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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 15, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

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ops 10,000 From foreign troops in English pay, sixpence in the pound 15,000 For keeping a table 1,000 £54,826 In addition to this, his wife had offices which swelled their joint receipts to £90,000 a year — a sum which might satisfy even a speculating member of Lincoln's Cabinet. In the reign of Anne the iniquities of the leading politicians were of the most scandalous character. Fidelity and honesty were virtues entirely unknown among the public men of Great Britain. Macaulay says: "Among those politicians who, from the Restoration to the accession of the House of Hanover, were at the head of the great parties in the State, very few can be named whose reputation is not stained by what in our age would be called gross perfidy and corruption. It is scarcely an exaggeration to say that the most unprincipled public men that have taken part in affairs within our memory would, it tried by the standard which was in fashion during the latter part of the 17th cen