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The Daily Dispatch: October 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], Diplomatic correspondence between Secretary Seward and Lord Lyons. (search)
y that, in their opinion, the authority of Congress is necessary in order to justify the arbitrary arrest and imprisonment of British subjects. I have the honor to be, sir, with the highest consideration, your most obedient humble servant. Lyons. To the Hon. William H. Seward, &c. Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. Department of State, Washington, Oct. 14, 1861. My Lord: --I have the honor to acknowledge your lordship's note of the present date. In that paper you inform me thatre, to prefer and be governed by the view of our organic national law which, while it will enable him to execute his great trust with complete success, receives the sanction of the highest authorities of our own country, and is sustained by the general consent of the people, for whom alone that Constitution was established. I avail myself of this opportunity to offer to your lordship a renewed assurance of my very high consideration. William H. Seward. The Right Hon. Lord Lyons, &c.
ontest unquestionably will be. And this last objection is applicable with far greater force to Mr. Lyons. Although every impartial man in the district can see the moral certainty of his defeat, idates a few days after. Mr. Tyler's nomination appearing in the newspapers the next day after Mr. Lyons's, it is believed, and probably written before Mr. Lyons's. Let the people hold Mr. Lyons to hMr. Lyons's. Let the people hold Mr. Lyons to his own voluntary offer, and if he will not withdraw, as was expected of him, let the people themselves execute his first (and best) intention. To Mr. Macfarland the objections have been already Mr. Lyons to his own voluntary offer, and if he will not withdraw, as was expected of him, let the people themselves execute his first (and best) intention. To Mr. Macfarland the objections have been already partly intimated. A strenuous opponent up to the last moment of secession in the Convention of Virginia, where he denied in argument the sovereignty of the States and the right of succession as absund yet such a disastrous result may be seriously hazarded by the persistence in the canvass of Mr. Lyons. Another great objection to Mr. Macfarland is his office of Bank President which, while i