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The Daily Dispatch: October 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], Diplomatic correspondence between Secretary Seward and Lord Lyons. (search)
forces actually in the field and besieging the Capital of the United States. A portion of this correspondence, which was intercepted, was addressed to the firm of Smith & Patrick, brokers, long established and doing business in the city of New York. It appeared that this firm had a branch at Mobile, that the partner, Smith, is a Smith, is a disloyal citizen of the United States, and that be was in Europe when the treasonable papers were sent from Mobile, addressed through the house of Smith & Patrick, in New York. On receiving this information Wm. Patrick was arrested and committed into military custody at Fort Lafayette by an order of the Secretary of War of the UniSmith & Patrick, in New York. On receiving this information Wm. Patrick was arrested and committed into military custody at Fort Lafayette by an order of the Secretary of War of the United States addressed to the police of the city of New York. These proceedings took place on the 28th of August last. Representations were thereupon made to the Secretary of State by friends on the part of Mr. Patrick to the effect that not withstanding his associations he was personally loyal to this Government, and that he w
cers and crew of the Florida, throughout this little affair, behaved in a manner worthy of the highest praise. The steamer that engaged us is supposed to be the Cuyler. She is about 1,200 tons, very fast, and carries an armament of about tenguas, one of which, at least, is of great range. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Chas. W. Hays, Lieut. Com'g. Com. Geo. N. Hollins, Commanding Naval Station, New Orleans. Trouble among the Upper Creek Indians. The Fort Smith Times, of the 17th, has the following paragraph: A young man by the name of Dunxy arrived here yesterday evening. We learn from him that there is considerable excitement among the Upper Creeks. Opotheleyoholo is at the head of his party of about 2,000 men. A large number of negroes, belonging to Southern Indians, have runaway, and all the women and children have fled, and are now in the Choctaw county. The Southern Indians Mr. D. says, threaten vengeance on the Lincoln adherents.
Death of Col. Abel Smith. --Col. Abel Smith, Colonel of the Thirteenth Regiment of Brooklyn, who was injured by the cars on the 18th inst., died at four o'clock next morning. His remains were taken to Williamsburg. Death of Col. Abel Smith. --Col. Abel Smith, Colonel of the Thirteenth Regiment of Brooklyn, who was injured by the cars on the 18th inst., died at four o'clock next morning. His remains were taken to Williamsburg.