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The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Overton M. Price or search for Overton M. Price in all documents.

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ever, succeeded in boarding their steamers and pushing across the river. We burned everything possible and started back, having accomplished all that we went for and even more. Belmont is entirely covered by the batteries from Columbus, and is worth nothing as a military position — cannot be held without Columbus. The object of the expedition was to prevent the enemy from sending a force into Missouri to cut off troops I had sent there for a special purpose, and to prevent reinforcing Price. Besides being well fortified at Columbus, their number far exceeded ours, and it would have been folly to have attacked them. We found the Confederates well armed and brave. On our return, stragglers that had been left in our rear (not front,) fired into us, and more re-crossed the river and give us battle for a full mill and afterwards at the boats when we were embarking. There was no hasty retreating or running away. Taking into account the object of the expedition, the victo
ony, were in attendance yesterday, but were discharged in consequence of the sickness of a witness, and the trial did not commence. Confederate States vs. Chapman J. Leigh, on a petition to sequestrate the property of Charles M. Fry and Overton M. Price, as alien enemies. Mr. Price appeared by R. R. Howison, his attorney, and with the leave of the Court filed his plea in writing to the petition and proceedings in this case; and leave is reserved to the District Attorney to move to reject tconsequence of the sickness of a witness, and the trial did not commence. Confederate States vs. Chapman J. Leigh, on a petition to sequestrate the property of Charles M. Fry and Overton M. Price, as alien enemies. Mr. Price appeared by R. R. Howison, his attorney, and with the leave of the Court filed his plea in writing to the petition and proceedings in this case; and leave is reserved to the District Attorney to move to reject the said plea or to except thereto for good cause shown.
on of the State. A bearer of dispatches from Missouri arrived in this city yesterday afternoon, bringing intelligence of the formal secession of that State from the United States, by act of her Legislature. This body is the regular Legislature of the State, elected more than a year ago; and is the only existing representative of her sovereignty. Application will at once be made for the admission of Missouri into the Confederate States. By the same hands we learn that on Tuesday week last, when our informant left Gen. Price's camp, that officer, with his gallant army, was in face of the enemy near Springfield, expecting an early engagement. Northern dispatches of a later date represent that Gen. Hunter, the successor of Fremont, has retreated with his whole army eastward, and was making his way to St. Louis. The bearer of dispatches was five days on his way from Memphis to this city, having been delayed by the interruption consequent upon the doings of the bridge-burners.
rive here to-day or to-morrow. Gen. Wyman brought a number of rebel prisoners, among them Col. Price and several other officers. Details of News from Washington. From the Washington Star of blacks on their arrival. The peace of Missouri--negotiations between Gens. Fremont and Price. The St. Louis Republican states that before the removal of Gen. Fremont negotiations were opupon, and, having received Gen. Fremont's signature, all that was wanting was the signature of Gen. Price to give it effect. A messenger was dispatched from Springfield to General Price's camp for thGeneral Price's camp for this express purpose, but as Gen. Fremont was removed before his return, it is not known that Gen. Price did actually append his name to the paper. The presumption is strong that he did so, for all thGen. Price did actually append his name to the paper. The presumption is strong that he did so, for all the preliminaries, and even the form of expression, had been agreed upon between him and his commissioners. Whether, however, Gen. Hunter, now in the discharge of the duties of this department, has rat