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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Latest Northern News. the Latest from Port Royal — the War in Missouri--Confederate prisoners to be discharged — arrival of members of Congress at Washington, &c. Our summary is made up from Northern papers of the 15th, 16th, and 20ton with them. On their return they met a squad of rebel cavalry, who gave them fodder for their horses. The War in Missouri--Capture of Confederate property--Federal commissary stores, &c., taken by Confederates. Kansas City, Nov. 18. -m was a girl fourteen years of age. The fugitives were received by a body of blacks on their arrival. The peace of Missouri--negotiations between Gens. Fremont and Price. The St. Louis Republican states that before the removal of Gen. Fremont negotiations were opened between the commanders of the opposing armies in Missouri for the pacification of the State by confining hostilities to the armies in the field — no more political arrests were to be made, and no citizen engaged in the peac<
Gratifying intelligence from Missouri--formal Secession of the State. A bearer of dispatches from Missouri arrived in this city yesterday afternoon, bringing intelligence of the formal secession of that State from the United States, by act of her Legislature. This body is the regular Legislature of the State, elected more tMissouri arrived in this city yesterday afternoon, bringing intelligence of the formal secession of that State from the United States, by act of her Legislature. This body is the regular Legislature of the State, elected more than a year ago; and is the only existing representative of her sovereignty. Application will at once be made for the admission of Missouri into the Confederate States. By the same hands we learn that on Tuesday week last, when our informant left Gen. Price's camp, that officer, with his gallant army, was in face of the enemyMissouri into the Confederate States. By the same hands we learn that on Tuesday week last, when our informant left Gen. Price's camp, that officer, with his gallant army, was in face of the enemy near Springfield, expecting an early engagement. Northern dispatches of a later date represent that Gen. Hunter, the successor of Fremont, has retreated with his whole army eastward, and was making his way to St. Louis. The bearer of dispatches was five days on his way from Memphis to this city, having been delayed by the inter
at Vienna; Gen. Cadwallader has passed into the shades of forgetfulness, and as for Gen. Patterson, since the battle of Manassas, none name him but to course him. Gen. McDowell, a veteran regular chieftain, who once stood so high in Federal estimation as to be entrusted with the leading of the "Grand Army" in its first great trial of arms with the rebels, has been buried in the deep bosom of the ocean of oblivion. The illustrious Fremont has been hurled beadlong from his high eminence in Missouri, and by late advices we observe that his trusty lieutenant, Gen. McKinstry, who recently figured as Provost Marshal at St. Louis, and sent honest people to jail with as little ceremony as his master in Washington, has been himself put under arrest, and is now in a situation, like many better men, to contemplate at his leisure the mutability of human fortune. If the Federals have been as successful as they pretend, in the conduct of the war, why are they constantly falling out with thei
ipage, artillery, and everything else. We got a great many prisoners. The majority, however, succeeded in boarding their steamers and pushing across the river. We burned everything possible and started back, having accomplished all that we went for and even more. Belmont is entirely covered by the batteries from Columbus, and is worth nothing as a military position — cannot be held without Columbus. The object of the expedition was to prevent the enemy from sending a force into Missouri to cut off troops I had sent there for a special purpose, and to prevent reinforcing Price. Besides being well fortified at Columbus, their number far exceeded ours, and it would have been folly to have attacked them. We found the Confederates well armed and brave. On our return, stragglers that had been left in our rear (not front,) fired into us, and more re-crossed the river and give us battle for a full mill and afterwards at the boats when we were embarking. There was no ha