Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Beauregard or search for Beauregard in all documents.

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ssance in force from Cairo was made in order to ascertain the strength and force of our position in Mississippi. The Yankee papers say it is soon to be followed up by a grand movement down the Mississippi river, both by land and water, and in half a dozen directions. Another object of the well supported reconnaissance was to threaten Columbus in the rear, to prevent General Polk from sending reinforcements to Buckner or Bowling Green, or from affording relief to the Confederates at camps Beauregard and Felicia. Northern Railroad facilities. The Yankee Congress is engaged in considering the subject of increased railroad facilities between New York and Washington. One proposition is to construct a new road direct from Washington to New York; another provides for the construction of double tracts and sidings on existing routes. With a view to prepare a bill providing for the repair and protection by the Government of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad where it has been dest
Gen. Beauregard. We announced some days ago that General Beauregard had been transferred from his position on the Potomac to the command of the forces at Columbus. We cannot witness his departure without expressing the deep sense of admiration and gratitude which is felt towards him by the people of Virginia, military and ciGeneral Beauregard had been transferred from his position on the Potomac to the command of the forces at Columbus. We cannot witness his departure without expressing the deep sense of admiration and gratitude which is felt towards him by the people of Virginia, military and civil, and of the whole South within her limits. The enthusiasm which was a kindled for him, by the successful reduction of Fort Sumter, has been only increased and intensified by his subsequent services on the banks of the Potomac. He was then comparatively an unknown man, and there were many who said that, although he had servedf a great man. All acknowledge now, however, that the brilliant power of the rising sun has been more than surpassed by its meridian glory. For nearly a year Gen. Beauregard has been tried in the presence, and under the close inspection of the assembled South in Virginia, of the enemy at Washington, and of an interested world. It