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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 42 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 38 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 27 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for English or search for English in all documents.

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s duration had engendered and rooted in the Southern breast. We had begun to recur to the annals of the olden time, anterior to the Revolution, when it was the pride of our ancestry to proclaim and inculcate a devoted loyalty to the British crown. We reflected that the tides of immigration that had set in upon American shores for so many years had spread themselves over the North, and had very little overflowed into our Southern boundaries; that our blood was, in consequence, still purely English, and that ties of consanguinity, if they had any force, bound us more closely to the English than to the hybrid and motley races that inhabit the North. These remote recollections, these obvious reflections, and the feelings naturally springing from them, were fast producing a strong partiality for the mother land in the hearts of our race; and we were looking with an interest, somewhat dramatic, to the reception which our Commissioners would receive — not from the British Government, whic
Arrival of a German Yankee. --The Central train that arrived yesterday morning brought, among other passengers, a German named Louis Boden, a private in the Eight a Regiment New York State Militia, who was recently captured by our pickets on the line of the Potomac. He was lodged in one of the military prisons. Boden can hardly speak a half dozen words of English, and has been in this country but a few months.