Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Seward or search for Seward in all documents.

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e hostile intentions and unscrupulous purposes of the English Government; but Mr. Seward has opportunities for information of these subjects enjoyed by note others, aYork, late a prisoner at Richmond, had an interview with the President and Secretary Seward yesterday, and it has been determined to place the rebel privateers, now iBritish troops through Maine. The New York Herald publishes a letter from Mr. Seward to the Governor of the State of Maine, explaining the reasons why he directedtland of British troops, and their safe conduct through the State to Canada. Mr. Seward says that the State Department having been informed by telegraph on the 4th o Maine should have any objection to the instructions of the State Department, Mr. Seward says that he is perfectly willing to modify them, as the Federal Gov'mt recogr of Maine on the subject; but it will be admitted that the course adopted by Mr. Seward in the matter was magnanimous and sebaceous. The Mutiny at St. Louis.
Seward's Views in 1857. --Mr. Seward, the present Secretary of State, made a tour through Canada in 1857, and in a series of letters to the Albany Journal of that year, we find the following paragraphs, detailing the result of his observations: Perhaps my meditations on the political destinies of the region around me mMr. Seward, the present Secretary of State, made a tour through Canada in 1857, and in a series of letters to the Albany Journal of that year, we find the following paragraphs, detailing the result of his observations: Perhaps my meditations on the political destinies of the region around me may be unsubstantial, but I will, nevertheless, confess and avow them. Hitherto, in common with most of my countrymen, as I suppose I have thought Canada — or, to speak more properly, British America — a mere strip lying north of the United States, easily detachable from the parent State, but incapable of sustaining itself, and thng to establish feeble States out of decaying Spanish provinces on the coast and in the islands of the Gulf of Mexico. It is understood now to be the policy of some of Mr. Seward's friends to establish negro colonies in "the feeble States of decaying Spanish provinces on the coast and in the islands of the Gulf of Mexico.