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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 191 93 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 185 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 182 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 156 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 145 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 128 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 106 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 84 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

r the week, were 5,500. Orleans Tres Ordinar, 152 francs. The stock was 112,000 bales. The Bank of France had reduced its rates of discount to four per cent. The formation of a league for armed neutrality was under advisement, to protect the commerce of neutrals in case of maritime war. Louisville, Feb. 23.--Rumors, which cannot be traced to any reliable source, prevail here, of the evacuation of Nashville by the Confederates. Five thousand of the prisoners taken at Fort Donelson have arrived at Indianapolis, and 4,000 at Camp Douglas. Washington, Feb. 23.--In the Senate yesterday Mr. Sumner presented three petitions from Pennsylvania, praying for the general emancipation of all slaves under the war power. Clarkesville is certainly in the possession of the Federal troops. The forts and guns on Roanoke Island have been put in good order. Gen. Burnside is said to be very active in preparing to strike a decisive blow where it is least expected.
rement of arms, and the want of a navy has greatly impeded our efforts to import military supplies of all sorts. I have hoped for several days to receive official reports in relation to our discomfiture at Roanoke Island, and the fall of Fort Donelson. They have not yet reached me, and I am, therefore, unable to communicate to you such information of those events and the consequences resulting from them, as would enable me to make recommendations founded upon the changed condition which they have produced. Enough is known of the surrender at Roanoke Island to make us feel that it was deeply humiliating, however imperfect may have been the preparations for defence. The hope is still entertained that our reported losses at Fort Donelson have been greatly exaggerated, inasmuch as I am not only unwilling, but unable to believe that a large army of our people have surrendered without a desperate effort to cut their way through investing forces, whatever may have been their numbers
Cannonading heard two hundred miles. A gentlemen from Hunter's Bottom, in Kentucky, states that the cannonading at Fort Donelson was distinctly heard at that point. It is two hundred miles in a straight line from Fort Donelson. The sounds were so distinct that the people were of opinion that a great battle was raging at Louisville. The Madison Courier also states that the sounds were indistinctly heard at that point. There must have been something of a noise at Donelson. Cannonading heard two hundred miles. A gentlemen from Hunter's Bottom, in Kentucky, states that the cannonading at Fort Donelson was distinctly heard at that point. It is two hundred miles in a straight line from Fort Donelson. The sounds were so distinct that the people were of opinion that a great battle was raging at Louisville. The Madison Courier also states that the sounds were indistinctly heard at that point. There must have been something of a noise at Donelson.
where General Johnston has established his headquarters, and where, I presume, he intends to make a stand against the enemy. Our scattered columns begin to come in rapidly, and in a few days we will be in good trim again. This is the Bowling Green army, and comprises, amongst others, the brigades of Gen. Breckinridge, Gen. Hardee, and Gen. Hindman. They are as brave and daring a set of fellows as ever trod the field. Before this reaches you, you will have heard of our disaster at Fort Donelson on Sunday morning. For three days did our little army, under the commands of Pillow, Floyd and Buckner, struggle with complete and brilliant success against the enemy, who out numbered our forces at least four to one. The enemy was driven from all his positions at the point of the bayonet, his batteries assaulted and taken, and hundreds of his mercenaries slaughtered upon the field. Never was there such a struggle upon this continent — never more daring heroism and unflinching courage
expressed the hope "that the links in the chain of the Union would soon be more firmly united than ever." Union men also informed the released prisoner that the army at Manassas was falling back; that from three to four regiments were daily arriving at Richmond, and that the Tennessean were going to Tennessee, and the Carolinians and others to their respective States. He also understood that only some thirty regiments would remain at Manassas. The news of the surrender of Fort Donelson had a most disheartening effect at Richmond, but cheered the hopes of the Unionists, who say they want it to be known by the Federal Government that they are ready to welcome the old flag and fight for it. From Washington — the Confederates falling back — expedition near Vienna, &C. From the New York Herald's special Washington dispatches, of the 20th instant, we make the following extracts: Information has been received that the rebels have in part fallen back from Centrevi