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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

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e military student's particular attention, thought it better, as a general rule, to select for a Commander-in-Chief a man of large mind and great force of character, who had never had anything to do with the army, than a veteran who had risen, by hard service, from an inferior position through all the grades. The latter, he thought, would be too apt to be cramped and confined by precedents, technicalities, and the received traditions of the service, like the Earl of Cork, who, according to Macaulay, executed the most precise and beautiful manœuvres, all faultless, according to the drill book, on the field of Almansa, and wound up by losing all his artillery, all his baggage, all his munitions of war, and 13,000 men out of 25,000. So much for technical routine. The danger is, that the pupils of a military school, unless they have genius enough to escape from its trammels, after a sufficient lapse of time spent in the army to bring them up to the grade of Colonels, will become the sla