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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

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Human nature. --For the benefit of the people of the present day, we make the following extract from volume three, Macaulay's History of England: It is the nature of man to overrate present evil, and to underrate present good; to long for what he has not, and to be dissatisfied with what he has. This propensity, as it appears in individuals, has often been noticed both by laughing and weeping philosophers. It was a favorite theme both of Horace and Pascal, of Voltaire and of Johnson. To its influence on the late of great communities may be ascribed most of the revolutions and counter-revolutions recorded in history. * * Down to the present hour, rejoicing like those on the shore of the Red Sea have ever been speedily followed by murmuring at the waters of Strife. The most just and salutary revolution cannot produce all the good that has been expected from it by men of uninstructed minds and sanguine tempers. Even the wisest cannot, while it is still recent, weigh qu