Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Bowling Green, Wood County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) or search for Bowling Green, Wood County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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organize the army, in order to put it in fighting condition to advance on Chattanooga, which It would now seem has become a dernier resort, in order for Buell to save himself, if it be true that his supplies and retreat to Nashville be cut off. It was believed that if it were practicable for Buell to reach Nashville with his troops, he would gladly have given up Andy Johnson's mad project of taking East Tennessee, and even abandoned Middle Tennessee, so as to reach his old stand point at Bowling Green, for the defence of Kentucky. His army is principally composed of Indians and Illinois troops, with the 77th Pennsylvania, three from Missouri, and some Kentucky and Ohio regiments. Another letter states Buell's army at 40,000 men, and says a "dash" would capture the whole command. It adds: All that is left of the Grand Yankee army of the Southwest is on its last legs. Halleck has resigned. Grant is trying to guard the lines around Memphis. Pope having so well succeeded
e foe, the telegraph can be made urlous rather than beneficial to those who employ it. The Louisville and Nashville line was first tapped by the operator near Bowling Green; thus: I took down the telegraph wire and connected my pocket instrument, for the purpose of taking off all dispatches as they passed through. Owing to a heavy storm prevailing South, the atmospheric electricity prevented me from communicating with Bowling Green or Nashville. The first I heard was Louisville calling Bowling Green. I immediately put on my ground wire southward, noticing particularly at the same time what change it would make in the circuit. It did make it strongeBowling Green. I immediately put on my ground wire southward, noticing particularly at the same time what change it would make in the circuit. It did make it stronger; but the storm mentioned affecting telegraphs more or leas, Louisville did not suspicion anything wrong, and I answered for Bowling Green, when I received the following message: Louisville,July, 10. "To S. D. Brows, Bowling Green? "You and Col. Houghton move together. I fear the force of Col. H. is too small t