Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John H. Morgan or search for John H. Morgan in all documents.

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olling officers, and held to service, wherever they may be found, whether they are residents of the State or county where they may be found or not; and any person leaving without proper permission after said enrollment, shall be held and declared a deserter, and punished as such. A message was received from the President, transmitting a communication from the Secretary Referred. A message was received from the House, announcing the adoption of a joint resolution of thanks to Gen. John H. Morgan, his officers and men. Mr. Yancey, of Ala., presented the following series of resolutions: Resolved, by the Senate of the Confederate States of America, That the war which is now being waged by the United States for the avowed purpose of subjugating the people of the several States of this Government to the dominion of the Government of the United States, is, in the opinion of the Senate, a war as well upon the people as upon the Government of the Confederate States of Ame
hospitals or sent to their regiments, and 500 or 600 more will be similarly disposed of. In all the hospitals of Alexandria — a dozen or more — not a woman is acting as nurse, or in any way alleviating the wants of the sick and wounded. John H. Morgan. A correspondent of the Louisville Express gives the following description of Morgan as he appeared at Georgetown: He mingled unarmed among the motley crowd collected to view the great bugbear of the age. His dress was plain, with nMorgan as he appeared at Georgetown: He mingled unarmed among the motley crowd collected to view the great bugbear of the age. His dress was plain, with no military insignia but a sin- gle row of buttons on his well fitting cavalry jacket of mixed green and gray cassimere, which he wore unbuttoned. He wore no vest, and had on a black silk watch-guard and diamond pin. His hat was a black felt, pinned up on the left side, and ornamented with a crescent of quilled work in porcupine or palm leaf. His carriage was graceful, but all the time he seemed more busied in looking after his command — the minutest details of which seemed not to escape him