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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 12, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Rip Winkle or search for Rip Winkle in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: September 12, 1862., [Electronic resource], The Uprising in the West--Salt manufacture — the Conscript law. (search)
for their people, and that Virginia had no works, nor any prospect of supplying her people Georgia had erected works, and is now furnishing to her people large quantities of salt. She, long since, made a contract at a bonus of fifty cents per bushel to the owners of the works for all the salt she may make during the war, not exceeding three hundred thousand bushels per annum. I saw hundreds of bags already filled, containing one bushel each intended for the wives of the soldiers. Old Rip Van Winkle (North Carolina) had a similar contract, (except that she paid seventy five cents instead of fifty cents,) and was also manufacturing in fine style for her poor citizens. Tennessee was fast erecting works, and Alabama will commence in a few days. The city of Richmond has contracted for twelve thousand bushels, one thousand to be delivered every month. Half of these works were sold for $450,000, and bought by a half Yankee and half Virginia Yankee company. They profess to sell the sal