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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

his trows loons. It was truly affecting to see the citizens, and particularly the ladies, (God bless their souls,) kindly welcoming the Southern soldiers, and offering refreshments to their true friends. The killed on our side were three Virginians and two Georgians. For want of transportation, we had to destroy all of the tents, stores, &c., and about one thousand bushels of corn. The enemy have only been above Williamsburg but once since the battle, and then but a short distance frtillery and cavalry, was encamped four miles this side of Williamsburg. Our scouts, on Wednesday, saw two Federal soldiers up as high as Barhamsville, 18 miles this side of Williamsburg. The Yankees ran off. Mr. Taylor, on his way up, saw 14 Virginians who had escaped from the Eastern Shore. They describe the Yankee rule there as very oppressive, though the force there is not very large. In noticing the battle of Williamsburg, it should have been stated that the charge made by our troop