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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 283 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 274 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 168 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 147 55 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 94 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 76 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 66 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) or search for Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1862., [Electronic resource], A heart dislocated on the battle-field. (search)
uragement in the present state of affairs. It appears, then, that on Sunday, 14th September, the corps of D. H. Hill was attacked by the entire force of McClellan; that after an obstinate resistance, one wing was forced to give ground; that it retired slowly, fighting as it fell back, and was never routed; that it was reinforced by Longstreet, recovered all it had lost, and slept upon the field of battle; that Gen. Lee having come up, removed the two corps to a position in the rear at Sharpsburg that Monday and Tuesday were spent in cannonading at long taw; that on Wednesday a general battle was fought, in which Gen. Lee obtained a decided advantage; and that on Thursday evening, perfectly at his leisure, he withdrew his army across the Potomac, with out being molested by the enemy. This last fact is sufficient to prove that he could not at least have been very badly beaten; for the Yankee papers, anticipating such a movement, proclaimed in advance that he would certainly be dest
in sight of McClellan ! Longstreet then fell back to unite with Jackson and Hill, who, having finished their job at the Ferry, marched to join him. On Tuesday, the 16th of September, the two grand armies encountered each other near Sharpsburg, in Maryland. The scene of conflict was a valley about two miles wide, running south from Boonsboro' to the Potomac river near Sharpsburg; the latter place being near the Maryland side of the Potomac, and some miles up the river from Shepherdstown. Sharpsburg; the latter place being near the Maryland side of the Potomac, and some miles up the river from Shepherdstown. This valley is divided by the Antietam creek, which runs down it into the Potomac a few miles below Shepherdstown. On the east side of the valley and of the Antletam lay McClellan, with the abrupt Blue Ridge mountain behind him. On the west side of the Antletam lay Gen. Lee's army, with high mountains rising in his rear. The battle commenced on Tuesday afternoon, was renewed on Wednesday, and was continued until the night of that day. At that time Jackson had driven back the enemy's right
s more general than any yet — the loss very heavy on our side, and equally so on the part of the enemy. The result was favorable to us. The enemy were driven back after fighting all day, but it was hard work with us. At one time our centre had been broken, but Gen. Jackson retrieved the day with his corps. This morning we were advancing upon the enemy beyond the battle field of yesterday, and they were retiring before us without replying to our artillery. All this fighting has been near Sharpsburg, about three miles North of Shepherdstown." This letter, as stated, was written on Thursday night, and contains information to 10 o'clock of Thursday. Up to that time the advantage remained with our arms. We have no information of any subsequent conflict. Passengers by the Central train yesterday afternoon were unable to furnish us anything authentic from the army. The impression created by the information brought by them was, that only a portion of our forces had recrossed