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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 29, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Humors of the War. from the Capital — great metaphysical victory. [From the N. Y. Sunday Mercury.] Prefacing his epistle with facts calculated to prove, that business is improving, and that New England is still herself, our valiant and observing correspondent minutely describes a great metaphysical victory, recently elaborated to consummation by that inspired son of Mars, the General of the Mackerel Brigade. It will take but a few years to finish the war at this rate, and then the Gnd buoyant here, my boy; a sense that the President is an honest man inspiring confidence on every side, and surrounding the Government with well-known confidence men. The repeated safety of the Capital, indeed, has even inspired the genius of New England, as illustrated by a thoughtful Boston chap, with one of those enlarged business ideas which will yet enable that section to be trade the whole world. The thoughtful Boston chap has read all the war news, my boy, for the last six months, and
ur military commanders were severely criticised, no censure will be past upon any of the Union commanders in the address of the Governors, as I understand. On their way to Washington the Governors stopped at Harrisburg, as the guests of Gov. Curtin, for dinner. The car in which they ride is the one in which the Palace of Wales, James Buchanan, and President Lincoln rode, and is splendidly re-furnished. A dispatch to the New York Herald, dated Altoona, 25th, says: The New England Governors, and a portion of the Western went to Altoona for the sole purpose of securing the removal of McClellan and the appointment of Fremont; but were defeated by the noble and determined stand taken by Governors Tod. Curtin, and Bradford. The country is to-day indebted to those three officials for defeating the treasonable plans of the radicals. Governor Andrew was the leader in the anti-McClellan cabal, Governor Sprague and Governor Yates assisting in the light work. The battle