Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Seward or search for Seward in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

of this awful receptacle for prisoners can never probably be fully told; and we have only briefly sketched it to show some portion of the machinery used in conducting the business of the provost marshal's office. The Paris Constitutionnel on Seward's emigration Project. The Paris Constitutionnel, after copying an extract from the London Times, giving a most deplorable account of the condition of the Federal arms at the present moment, adds, a relation to Mr. Seward's emigration circular;Mr. Seward's emigration circular; "And this is the moment chosen by the Government of the North to declare 'that at no previous time have the agricultural, manufacturing, and mining interests of the United States been so prosperous.' We should be content to laugh at so strange an assertion if we did not reflect that it might make dupes and victims in Europe, and draw to New York credulous emigrants, who, instead of the fortune which is insidiously promised them, would find no other resource than an enrollment in the Federal arm
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1862., [Electronic resource], An English Analysis of American Photographs. (search)
annibal Hamblin, Vice-President, who is chiefly interesting on account of what he might become. Turn over, and Mr. Stanton gives a sitting for his head alone, the lines of which do not stand comparison very well with the keen, clear outline of Mr. Seward's features, next to it. Why did not Mr. Brady give the full face of Mr. Seward, so that one could see his eye? In other respects the likeness, though it does not convey that air of "cunning and conceit" which Priace Napoleon's attache attributMr. Seward, so that one could see his eye? In other respects the likeness, though it does not convey that air of "cunning and conceit" which Priace Napoleon's attache attributed in his to the Secretary of State, is characteristic and true. Pass over Mr. Batel, and we come to Mr. Chase, who is standing with one hand outside his coat, over his breeches pocket, and the other on a plaster of Paris pedestal, looking as though he were waiting for some one to lend him a little money, and expecting it, too. He has one of the best heads among the Cabinet, though one cannot help remarking that he has a detect in his eyes, and oddly enough so has Gen. Butler, and so has