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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 110 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 18 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 66 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 62 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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emy's lines, capturing and destroying a deal of the enemy's property. Gen. Jennifer, who accompanied him, came into-town at 12 o'clock last night. Gen. Stuart started Sunday morning, crossed over the Potomac at Williamsport, proceeded some thirty miles into Pennsylvania, and returned via Leesburg, bringing with them 1,000 horses, and a number of prisoners, in addition to the shoes, boots, clothes, blankets, &c., &c., of which each man brought as much as he could. It is said that at Chambersburg they burnt over a million dollars' worth of stores. This feat surpasses the far famed exploit around the lines beyond Richmond, and will deservedly add many laurels to his well-earned wreath. Our army has recruited very much since the last battle. I understand that a large quantity of clothing and shoes have gone down, and that the army will soon be in a condition for active service again. Everything is quiet along our lines. Several cases of small pox have appeared, but they
ore, to place those cities in a proper posture of defence; but, notwithstanding these, and notwithstanding the presence of General Beauregard at Charleston, neither that city nor Savannah is considered absolutely safe. The Confederates in Chambersburg. The Philadelphia Inquirer has long accounts of the recent raid to Chambersburg, furnished by its correspondents, from which we extracts the following items of interest: The damage by the conflagration will exceed two hundred thousand Chambersburg, furnished by its correspondents, from which we extracts the following items of interest: The damage by the conflagration will exceed two hundred thousand dollars, of which amount the Cumberland Valley Railroad company suffer to the extent of $80,000. Mr O. N. Lull, the superintendent of the road, had all of his furniture destroyed. The car, engine, wood and water-houses of the company were totally destroyed, and for a space of three hundred square yards there is now nothing left but the blackened and smouldering remains. The track was uninjured. The warehouses of Messrs. Wunderlich & Neid contained a large amount of ammunition and stores; amon