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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 59 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 34 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 29 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 25 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 24 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 24 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dorn or search for Dorn in all documents.

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d that that place is defended by some thirty odd pieces of artillery. Were it not for the misfortune of two-thirds of Van-Dorn's ammunition having been destroyed by the heavy rains through which the command were recently forced to march, he would no for the arrival of his pontoons. A very few days will develops his plans, and the same length of time will precipitate Van Dorn, Wheeler, and Forrest upon him. As events transpire I will report them. Citizens from the Cumberland report that thaissance, where a small body of the enemy would have been unable to have made such a successful scout. From the fact of Van Dorn's having crossed the river a day or two before their arrival, it is possible that they were sent there to prevent his par inland merely for the purpose of ravaging and devastating. A considerable force was left at Florence and Tuscumbia by Van Dorn for the protection of the railroad running to Huntsville and Decatur, and to guard the cotton factory at Florence, and t