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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 1, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 1, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Guizot or search for Guizot in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: May 1, 1863., [Electronic resource], From Northwestern Virginia--movements of Gen. Imboden. (search)
to a report before us said: In adopting the equestrian figure of Washington the committee desire distinctly to any recognition of the embodiment of the idea of the "Cavalier. " We have no admiration for the character of the cavalier of 1649, any more than for that or his opponent, the Puritan. We turn with disgust from the violent and licentious cavalier, and we abhor the scorb, motor and fanatic Puritan, of whom Oliver Cromwell was the type. Inspecting of Cromwell and his character, Guizot says, "that he possessed the faculty of lying at need, with an and unhesitating hardihood, which struck even his enemies with surprise and embarrassment." This characteristic seems to have been transmitted to the descendants of the Pilgrims who settled in Massachusetts Bay, to enjoy the liberty of persecution. If the "caviller" is to carry us back to days carrier than the American Revolution, I prefer to be transported in imagination to the field-of Eunnymeds, where the barous extorted Mag