hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 1, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Puritan (Ohio, United States) or search for Puritan (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

The Daily Dispatch: May 1, 1863., [Electronic resource], From Northwestern Virginia--movements of Gen. Imboden. (search)
The cavalier and Puritan. In an interesting speech in the Confederate Senate upon the proposed Confederate seal, Mr. Semmes, of Louisiana, according to a report before us said: In adopting the equestrian figure of Washington the committee desire distinctly to any recognition of the embodiment of the idea of the "Cavalie49, any more than for that or his opponent, the Puritan. We turn with disgust from the violent and licentious cavalier, and we abhor the scorb, motor and fanatic Puritan, of whom Oliver Cromwell was the type. Inspecting of Cromwell and his character, Guizot says, "that he possessed the faculty of lying at need, with an and unhesumber of the best people of the South, when they are stigmata and as "violent and licentious." and held up to equal abhorrence with the "acerb, morass and fanatic Puritan," whose hand have always been red with cur blood and the blood of our fathers — The licentiousness of all classes, in the reign of Charles II, was, in great part,