Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 26, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

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etters. --A large batch of Yankee letters, picked up on the battle field and taken from Yankee prisoners have been sent to us. We find nothing especially remarkable in them. They are very monotonous. Most of them from women. All of them are exceedingly urgent upon the men to come home. Many of them ask for money--$10 being the sum generally needed. Many of them are addressed to men whose time is nearly out, and they are very pious in their prayers that these men may come home before Hooker advances. Execration of the war is a general sentiment, and despair of ever conquering the wretched rebels is another, almost as frequent in these practical epistles. One woman asks "Joe" to be more saving, not to spend his money with speculators and camp-followers, but to send more home to support his family. Another complains bitterly that her husband expected her to make $2 per week more than she did when it was impossible. She retorts by telling him he ought to send more money home th
Latest Northern news.Hooker's loss in the battles on the Rappahannock. Vicksburg Affairs — political matters in the Northern States, &c. Our correpiled from the Herald of the 22d, and the Washington Chronicle of the 23d: Hooker's army. The New York Herald, of the 22d, says: Hooker retreated withouHooker retreated without delivering a grand battle, and thinks Stoneman should have destroyed Richmond, and that McClellan's route to Richmond by James river is the best. Large numbersis eager for a decisive trial of its strength. The Philadelphia Press says Hooker has picked his flint, and is about to try again. The Herald correspondent, of the 18th, says of Hooker's army: It is believed we cannot remain here long. Six regiments of nine months men have been mustered out of service. The men ars, 635 men, 202 mules, 230 wagons, and 656 horses. Gen. Wadsworth reports Hooker's loss in his late move 25 to 33 per cent. of his entire army, which was at lea
The two Pictures. --The New York World has the following piquant paragraph: By a most unhappy coincidence the congratulatory orders of Generals Hooker and Lee appeared together in yesterday's newspapers. The publication of these two documents simultaneously will do the North almost as much discredit and the South as much credit in Europe as the result of the battles of the Rappahannock. It is the fate of many a brave and capable nation and army to be defeated; but to be untruthful, boastful, and false, when the occasion demands honesty, resignation, and a loyal hopefulness in adversity, will turn against us every civilized nation on earth. No honest and fair-minded man can have read these two orders yesterday without grief, and pain, and shame. It can no longer be denied — it is patent to the whole world — that the superior men, morally and mentally, are at the head of the wrong Government and the wrong army