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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 168 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 135 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 133 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 88 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 81 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 61 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 10, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sedgwick or search for Sedgwick in all documents.

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ough the ultimate result depends, of course, entirely on the issue of the battle on Monday, Gen. Hooker's objects seem to have been frustrated. It is true that Gen. Sedgwick's corps has succeeded in gaining possession of the heights above Fredericksburg; but this success will have been of no avail if Hooker is checkmated with the Rappahannock behind him, and if Lee was strong enough to force him back on Monday he must have been cut to pieces. He was ten miles away from Sedgwick's corps, and Lee separated the two divisions. The only chance of his success seemed to be that Sedgwick should be able to operate on Lee's right flank and rear before Hooker was cruSedgwick should be able to operate on Lee's right flank and rear before Hooker was crushed. We can anticipate no more hopeful tidings from the Government at Washington having kept back the news of the result of Monday's battle. If it should have been unfavorable, we do not wonder at their hesitating to proclaim so great a calamity. If Gen. Hooker is defeated the last chance of success, at least in Virginia, is go