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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 10, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Puritan (Ohio, United States) or search for Puritan (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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of their soil and industry. They were prompted by the basest passions in seeking the blood of the Southern people — by envy, cupidity, and revenge. Moreover, the war was the natural and legitimate result of the character and principles of that Puritan race which has always intermeddled with other people's business, which has always been interfering, dictatorial and arrogant, and has never been known willingly to permit any people to enjoy freedom of opinion or conscience but themselves. The been all their own, and if they have not had the nerve to execute with their own hands the vile conception of their evil hearts, so much the blacker is their infamy in the eyes of all mankind. That we have ever been the countrymen of these Puritan miscreants is our misfortune and not our fault, but it does not entitle them to any preference over men of different blood and lineage. On the contrary, it heightens and intensifies their guilt, and makes them more odious and abominable. It ma