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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 68 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 306 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 305 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 289 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 262 18 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 233 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 182 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 146 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for D. H. Hill or search for D. H. Hill in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

mained in Richmond. The York River train arrived about 12½ o'clock, and brought the particulars of the fight below Bottom's Bridge, in New Kent. From an intelligent gentleman, who was in the fight, we gather the following particulars. Gen. D. H. Hill advanced a portion of his force to feel the enemy, and found him about 6 ½ o'clock P. M., Thursday, at Dr. L. Crump's farm, just this side of the Cross Roads. Our troops formed in line of battle. Gen. Jonkins's South Carolina and Gen. Ransder Colonel West, commanding, at first presented a bold front, but as our infantry advanced in splendid order, at the double quick, they retreated. Gens. Jenkins's and Ransom's onslaught was bold and fearless, but as the enemy retired rapidly, Gen. Hill ordered Col. Shingler, with his cavalry, to the charge, which was executed in gallant and impetuous style, driving the enemy to Tunstall's, four miles, when darkness put an end to the pursuit. The enemy two or three times took an ambuscade, an