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Vallandigham's address. In the portion of this address which we republish to-day there appears a very strange statement. It is to the effect that he, (Vallandigham) while in the Confederate States, did not meet with a single person who was not resolved to perish rather than yield to the pressure of arms, but that every person he conversed with expressed himself willing, if the Yankees would withdraw their troops, to discuss the terms of reunion. We do not know who were the persons with wVallandigham) while in the Confederate States, did not meet with a single person who was not resolved to perish rather than yield to the pressure of arms, but that every person he conversed with expressed himself willing, if the Yankees would withdraw their troops, to discuss the terms of reunion. We do not know who were the persons with whom Mr. V. conversed. We are sure we have conversed with many more Southerners than he ever did, and we never heard the first yet speak in favor of reunion. He has certainly made a great mistake somehow or other.
Progress of the war. Mr. Vallandigham and his Constituents — What he thinks of the determination of the South. Mr. Vallandigham, from the Canada border, has printed an address to his fellow citizens of Ohio, in which occurs the following passage: For it, this civil war is to terminate only in the subjugation or submission of the South to force and arms, the infant of to-day will not live to see the end of it. No; in another way only can it be brought to a close. Traveling a thousanMr. Vallandigham, from the Canada border, has printed an address to his fellow citizens of Ohio, in which occurs the following passage: For it, this civil war is to terminate only in the subjugation or submission of the South to force and arms, the infant of to-day will not live to see the end of it. No; in another way only can it be brought to a close. Traveling a thousand miles and more, through nearly one half of the Confederate States, and sojourning for a time at widely different points, I met not one man, woman, or child, who were not resolved to perish rather than yield to the pressure of arms, even in the most desperate extremity. And whatever may and must be the varying fortune of the war, in all which I recognize the hand of Providence pointing visibly to the ultimate issue of this great trial of the States and people of America, they are better prepar