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received. The following is a summary of the news: From the Southwest. The steamer Ruth was burnt on the night of the 4th at Island No.1. She was bound for Helena, and had on board eight paymasters and $260,000 in "green backs" to pay Gen. Grant's army. Altogether about thirty lives were lost. The cargo embraced four hundred tons of commissary and sutler's stores, and about one hundred tons private freight. The boxes containing the money were consumed. Maine Democratic Conventicksburg, and the infantry is mostly distributed along the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. It is thought we shall all soon be ordered down to Falmouth." New Orleans advices to the let have been received. Gen. Henon's division of Grant's army had arrived there. Ex-Mayor Stith had been released from Fort Pickens, and had arrived at New Orleans. Articles in the journals of Washington, New York, etc., represent a war with Great Britain as imminent. Judge Agnew has been
The Daily Dispatch: August 10, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Strength of the Yankees on the Mississippi. (search)
number of the Federal forces on the Mississippi is greatly exaggerated. He says: From authentic sources, I have formed estimates which I think you will find more reliable then the extravagant statements published. The disposable force of Grant does not exceed 40,000 men. With these he will have to defend the two banks of the river, and to pursue and destroy Johnston and Kirlty Smith's armies, and to maintain a strong garrison at Vicksburg and at other points. He can get no reinforcemea, and he haste garrison New Orleans, Port Hudson, Donaldson and the forts. The force in the field does not exceed that which Taylor and Magrader can bring to bear against him. Those Generals already hold the western part of Louisiana; if Banks pursues them to the interior he leaves a weak force on the river and our light troops can operate with great effect. Whilst our armies must increase, those of the enemy must diminish.--Vicksburg has already cost General Grant half his original army.
The Yankees at Fortress Monroe. The Yankees say that the troops concentrating at Old Point are intended for Charleston. This is the Yankee mode of embodying the fact that they are intended for Richmond. At this season of the year troops will not be sent from the North to Charleston. Besides, if the troops concentrating at Charleston are a portion of Grant's forces, who came round by sea to Old Point, why did they not stop at Charleston on their way? We may expect them up the Peninsula, and will endeavor to give them a suitable welcome.
From Louisiana. Atlanta, Aug. 8. --A special dispatch to the Appeal, from Brandon, Miss., 6th inst., says: "Ransom's division of Grant's army, with seven "mosquito gunboats," descended the Mississippi and opened fire on the bayous of West Louisiana. " A heavy Yankee force ascended the St. Charles river, in search of our force in Arkansas. Dunt, brother in law and partner of Grant in negro apprentices, was recently captured near Lake Providence, La., by Col. Matt. F. Johnstonoats," descended the Mississippi and opened fire on the bayous of West Louisiana. " A heavy Yankee force ascended the St. Charles river, in search of our force in Arkansas. Dunt, brother in law and partner of Grant in negro apprentices, was recently captured near Lake Providence, La., by Col. Matt. F. Johnston's guerillas. The Confederates recaptured several thousand slaves with Dunt. The Yankee force is at Montcastle, on the Big Black, except the expedition to West Louisiana.