Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 10, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Mississippi (United States) or search for Mississippi (United States) in all documents.

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A Western opinion about the Mississippi being open. The Chicago Times, commenting on the great rejoicing at the East--for they are even greater in New England than they are in Illinois--over the re-opening of the Mississippi river, says: The vast expectations which have been built upon the events of the past few weeks in the Southwest will now receive the test of fulfillment or non fulfillment.--The opening of the Mississippi has been looked forward to as the consummation of all the hopes of Western men. With that great artery of commerce once more navigable, the old prosperity was to have returned, and the blessings of peace were to have fallen upon us as plentifully as rain drops in a summer shower. It is now in the possession of the North, from its source to the Gulf, and what are the prospects? We have fourteen hundred miles of navigable water in an enemy's territory, which we must guard with a constant patrol of gunboats in order to secure the most remote possibilit
ge up the river St. Lawrence to Quebec, whence he came by rail to Clifton. Hon. D. W. Vorhess, of Indiana, and Hon. Richard T. Merrick, of Chicago, were among the first to welcome him on his arrival. Hon. Messrs. Pendleton and McL are shortly expected to arrive. A Western opinion about the Mississippi being open. The Chicago Times, commenting on the great rejoicing at the East--for they are even greater in New England than they are in Illinois--over the re-opening of the Mississippi river, says: The vast expectations which have been built upon the events of the past few weeks in the Southwest will now receive the test of fulfillment or non fulfillment.--The opening of the Mississippi has been looked forward to as the consummation of all the hopes of Western men. With that great artery of commerce once more navigable, the old prosperity was to have returned, and the blessings of peace were to have fallen upon us as plentifully as rain drops in a summer shower. It