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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Reed or search for Reed in all documents.

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s bridge, eight miles west of Ringgold. Walthall's brigade was principally engaged and suffered most, one regiment losing 73 killed and wounded. Gen. Bushrod Johnson's brigade moved up at the time from Ringgold, crossing the Chickamauga above at Reed's bridge, the enemy falling back before us and marshalling their forces in line of battle. Their advance on Georgia soil had been so successful and easy that they seemed surprised at the idea of being checked, contemplating a triumphant entrance into Atlanta. On Saturday, the 19th, the two contending armies confronted each other in battle array. Our line extended from Reed's bridge to Lee & Gordon's mills, a distance of between seven and ten miles, over a rugged, barren country of hill and dale. Between 8 and 9 o'clock A. M. the battle opened on our right, in the course of an hour the firing because heavy and rapid, the batteries of Forrest's and Walker's divisions, and the reserve, Capt. Lumsden's battery, in command of Major Pa