Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Charles W. Russell or search for Charles W. Russell in all documents.

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dly relations, and will not receive a minister; and, therefore, it is no longer conducive to the interests, nor consistent with the dignity, of the Confederate Government, for Mr. Mason to continue his residence at London any longer. The London Index says it is not contemplated to withdraw Mr. Slidell. The prospect of the fall of Charleston is much debated in England. The friends of the South assert that it will not affect the issue, and the editor of the Army and Navy Gazette (Mr. Russell) cannot perceive what great military advantage would accrue from the capture. The Rhine has overflown its bed to the height of two metres, and the line of country upon that river is submerged. The Seine has also risen to a considerable height. The Patric, of the 25th, says that the question whether the Poles are to be recognized in the quality as belligerents has been continually raised by one of the two great maritime powers. The Alabama, Georgia, and Conrad, have been vi
Speech of Mr. Russell at the African Church. --Pursuant to announcement, and in response to a request of a number of influential citizens of this city, the Hon. Charles W. Russell, the eloquent Representative of the Wheeling District in Congress, addressed a large gathering of the people at the African Church last night. We have not space for even a brief outline of the speech, which, from beginning to ending, was marked by true eloquence and patriotic devotion, and received by his hearethe Hon. Charles W. Russell, the eloquent Representative of the Wheeling District in Congress, addressed a large gathering of the people at the African Church last night. We have not space for even a brief outline of the speech, which, from beginning to ending, was marked by true eloquence and patriotic devotion, and received by his hearers with manifestations of favor and applause. The several subjects which now interest and agitate the public mind were discussed with rare ability and with an earnestness that attested the speaker's sincerity. The currency was the first subject referred to, which, in the opinion of the speaker, was not beyond the reach of remedy. Its inflation was attributable to three causes: 1st, a scarcity of many of the commodities upon which we are compelled to rely; 2d, a redundancy of Confederate mone