Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for McClellan or search for McClellan in all documents.

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From Gen. Bragg's Army. [from our own Correspondent.] Army of Tennessee Near Chattanooga, Oct. 26, 1863. The Federal Government has just committed its second greatest blunder. I allude to the removal of Rosecrans and the appointment of Thomas to succeed him. McClellan is the best organizer of forces among all the Federal officers; Rosecrans the ablest campaigner and the best fighter. A great blunder was committed when the former was removed; a second blunder, almost as great, has just been made in the removal of the latter. The change is very popular with the Confederates, and even Gen. Bragg does not object to it. Officers who have known Rosecrans and Thomas both well for many years say we have made a gain by the exchange equivalent to 10,000 men; in other words, that Rosecrans is the better man of the two by 10,000 men. Thomas is a good fighter when he gets warmed up to the work; but ordinarily he is a slow man, and possesses neither the gift to organize an army
its contemporaries over a new route to Richmond. It is contended by one that the Peninsula is the only road by which the Federals can reach the "Rebel Capital," and by another that the Administration will not take it because it was chosen by Gen. McClellan. It says: Now we were not aware that Gen. McClellan had taken out a patent for the Peninsula line of operations against Richmond, though we had supposed that the lamentable failure he made in his attempt to reach the Rebel capital by tGen. McClellan had taken out a patent for the Peninsula line of operations against Richmond, though we had supposed that the lamentable failure he made in his attempt to reach the Rebel capital by this route, would not prove a very powerful temptation to infringe any right he may have to its exclusive possession. We rather fancy, however, that it will be found that the chief obstacle to our gaining Richmond by any of the half-a-dozen attempts we have made against it, by both the overland and the Peninsula lines, has been the rebel army that has obstructed our path, rather than anything in the path itself. If we could only discover a method of eliminating Lee's army, we imagine "On to Ric