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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Meade or search for Meade in all documents.

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commander much trouble. Gen. Thomas issued an order a few days ago, in which he declares that all persons guilty of pillaging will be severely punished, unless it be shown that they are receiving less than half rations. This is significant. Some of his pickets have offered to exchange an overcoat or a pair of shoes with our pickets for a gallon of meal. At other points on the lines, however, they say they have sufficient supplies. The reinforcements--two corps d'armes--sent out from Meade's army under Hooker are at Bridgeport. They number about 12,000 men. One corps is commanded by Slocum, the other by Williams. The river at Bridgeport is divided by an island of considerable length. Two pontoon bridges have been thrown across from the north bank to the island, and at last accounts preparations were being made to lay a third bridge from the island to the south bank. This latter work has probably been completed by this time. Hooker's pickets cover Sand Mountain to the dist
f Lee ventures on the further subtraction of another corps from the Army of Northern Virginia for reinforcement to the army fronting Chattanooga it will open to Gen. Meade an opportunity which he will quickly seize. If he does not venture to make this subtraction, owing to the menace of Meade's presence, the Army of the Potomac wMeade's presence, the Army of the Potomac will still be serving the purpose of keeping that force in check and thus lessening the task of our army in Tennessee. Whether or not Gen. Meade should at present attempt a new campaign against Richmond, is, therefore, simply a question of the relative strength of the two armies, and the cant about the "road to Richmond," and the aGen. Meade should at present attempt a new campaign against Richmond, is, therefore, simply a question of the relative strength of the two armies, and the cant about the "road to Richmond," and the ascription of any special magical virtues to that by the Peninsula, is the dictate either of an unintelligible stupidity or of a very intelligible factiousness. Gen. Scott--his last words. The "veteran hero" of Bull Run, Gen. Winfield Scott, has returned to New York and taken rooms at Delmonico's. The New York papers say