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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Meade or search for Meade in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], Attempt to cross the Rapidan — the enemy driven back. (search)
Attempt to cross the Rapidan — the enemy driven back. Yesterday morning a report was received by the Central cars that Meade's army had crossed the Rapidan river at Morton's, Somerville, and Raccoon Fords in large force.--This report subsequently proved untrue. By the train yesterday evening we get the following facts of the affair, which gave rise, doubtless, to the report mentioned: On Sunday morning about daylight the enemy appeared in large force at Morton's Ford and commenced cattery. A brisk fire was opened, which was replied to by the Confederates, and in a short time the fire from the other side of the river ceased. Five or six prisoners, captured in the skirmish at Morton's Ford, were brought down on the Central train last night. They speak of Meade's army having been much strengthened, and say that he has a "big lot" of men with him. Up to 11 o'clock yesterday there had been no renewal of the attempt to cross by the Yankees and no further fighting.
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], The London times on Confederate military movements. (search)
The London times on Confederate military movements. --The London Times, of the 26th ult., has an editorial on the late military operations of the Confederate commanders, resulting in the defeat of Rosecrans and the retreat of Meade. It says: In these last operations in Tennessee and Virginia the Confederate commanders have displayed a degree of military skill and a power of combining their force that the Federals have never been able to attain. The armies of General Lee and General Bragg, in Georgia and Northern Virginia, were more than four hundred miles apart in a straight line. Yet they cooperated with and supported each other with as much celeray as if they were engaged in one operation. A whole corps has been taken from one and added to the other with facility as great as if the main bodies had only been separated by the distance of a day's march. The immense advantage of railroads for the purposes of war has never yet been so signally proved as by the transfer o
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], Mede's official report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
Mede's official report of the battle of Gettysburg. Gen. Meade's official report of the battle of Gettysburg is published in the Northern papers. We yesterday gave a summary of the results as stated by him, and to-day publish, as a very interesting matter of history, his report. He says: The Confederate army, which was commanded by Gen. R. E. Lee. was estimated at over one hundred thousand strong. All that army had crossed the Potomac river and advanced up the Cumberland Valley. Reliable intelligence placed his advance thus:--Ewell's corps on the Susquehanna, Harrisburg, and Columbia. Longstreet's corps at Chambersburg, and Hill's corps between that place and Cashtown. The 28th of June was spent in ascertaining the positions and strength of the different corps of the army, but principally in bringing up the cavalry which had been covering the rear of the army in its passage over the Potomac, and to which a large increase had just been made from the force previou