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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 68 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Westminster (Maryland, United States) or search for Westminster (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], Mede's official report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
cock and Howard on the character of the position being favorable, I determined to give battle at this point, and early in the evening first issued orders to all corps to concentrate at Gettysburg, directing all trains to be sent to the rear at Westminster, at 11 P. M. first. Broke up my headquarters, which till then had been at Taneytown, and proceeded to the field, arriving there at 1 A. M. of the second. So soon as it was light I proceeded to inspect the position and to make arrangements foattle, the enemy retching to his lines, leaving the field strewed with his dead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburg, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the 29th, 30th, and 1st, had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was on the 3d sent on our extreme left, on the Emmetsburg road, where good service was rendered in assa