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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 2, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Russian or search for Russian in all documents.

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Lord Palmerston's speech. --The London Times contains in full the recent speech of Lord Palmerston upon the neutrality of England in the American war. We copy that portion referring to American and Russian affairs: There have been occasions when it was the lot of those who had to explain the state of affairs to congratulate you on the tranquil condition of the civilized world. I am afraid I cannot do that in the present instance; for, although I trust there is nothing in our horizon which can grow into a cloud of war, yet we see on all sides — in the far West and in the distant East.--struggles going on of the most lamentable character, and scenes enacted which make us shudder for humanity, and excite our deep compassion for the countries in which they are occurring. [Hear, hear.] In the far West we see a nation of the same race, the same language, the same religion, the same manners and literature as ourselves split into two, slaughtering each other by hundreds of thousa