hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 103 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 57 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 46 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 43 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 41 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 40 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 35 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 2, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Henry A. Wise or search for Henry A. Wise in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Foreign intervention. We like nothing better in the late letter of Henry A. Wise to Mr. Holmes than his manly and emphatic condemnation of the nervous anxiety for foreign intervention manifested by so many impatient people.--Whilst he desires recognition, he does not desire intervention, nor look upon it as a thing to be desired by any intelligent patriot. The man in a fight who is always looking over his shoulder to see if somebody is coming to help him, and abusing the by standers because they keep aloof, is not likely to impress the world with any very deep conviction of his conscious strength. No matter what the odds against us, we must struggle as if we had not a friend upon the earth if we ever expect to win our freedom, and shall be more likely to win friends by such proud self-reliance than by manifesting the slightest solicitude for outside aid. Liberty which is easily won is as easily lost, and independence which is achieved by, dependence upon others is independence