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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 4 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 1, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stafford or search for Stafford in all documents.

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ing his column around in time and seize Banks's Ford, the enemy, though most gallantly charged and well whippes by Hays's and like's brigades, of Early's and --'s divisions, succeeded in escaping under cover of night by way of Banks's Ford back to the Stafford heights. On Tuesday General Lee returned with the three division which had been engaged at Fredericksburg to Chancellorsville. A rain storm, however , set in on Tuesday evening, and on Tuesday night Hooker succeeded in recrossing to Stafford by way of U. S.Ford. Thus ended the Chancellorsville fights, in which the "finest army on the planet" was driven back with a loss of nearly ten thousand prisoners and fifteen thousand more in killed and wounded to the enemy. The great faux pas. of these battle was the failure to capture Sedgwick's corps, resulting from our not seizing Banks's Ford. The capture of his whole corps would then have been inevitable, for we held the access to Fredericksburg guarded — Our greatest loss was Ston