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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 252 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 148 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 145 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 130 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 96 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 95 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 85 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 76 2 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 76 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 72 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 8, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Judson Kilpatrick or search for Judson Kilpatrick in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

, and ordered to be engrossed. Adjourned. The House adopted a joint resolution recommitting the report of the joint committee to prepare an address to Virginia soldiers to said committee, with instructions to embody therein a proper reference to the recent raid upon this city, and to have the address printed for the use of members. A bill was passed authorizing the sheriffs of counties to summon posse cernitatus to aid in the enforcement of the impressment law in certain cases. The bill appropriating the public revenue for the ensuing fiscal year was passed. A joint resolution was introduced directing the collection and certifying of all the facts in connection with the recent attempt of Kilpatrick and Dahlgren to enter and ravage Richmond, and providing for their preservation upon record in the office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth. The resolution lies over under the rules. The joint resolution on the salt question was considered until the hour of recess.
Young raiders. --Brig-Gen. Judson Kilpatrick, was born in Sussex county New Jersey, on January 14, 1836, and is but 28 years of age. Brig. Gen. George A. Custer is a native of Ohio, and only graduated at West Point in 1861. He is, therefore, a much younger man than Kilpatrick. Ulric Dahlgren was younger than either of the above- mentioned, and hailed from the District of Columbia. Young raiders. --Brig-Gen. Judson Kilpatrick, was born in Sussex county New Jersey, on January 14, 1836, and is but 28 years of age. Brig. Gen. George A. Custer is a native of Ohio, and only graduated at West Point in 1861. He is, therefore, a much younger man than Kilpatrick. Ulric Dahlgren was younger than either of the above- mentioned, and hailed from the District of Columbia.
r people no prisoners would have been taken, and that they were not hung up instantly, all that were in our hands, upon reading what those purposes were, is an example of forbearance of a community under the extremest provocation that has hardly a precedent. Whatever is done about this raid and its participants in our hands, it would be madness to suppose any future expedition of the sort towards this city comes with any other purpose than that which lured on the band of cut-throats under Kilpatrick and Dahlgren, Of course every man can answer, and rightly, what should be our policy and duty when such another occasion arises. But the orders enjoined on the whole route those acts of barbarity which are intended to starve the people. Not only all the mills were to be burned, but everything that could be of service to the rebels was ordered to be destroyed. The acts of these raiders and their orders are only in conformity with the deeds of all the invaders in every part of the cou