Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 19, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Abe Lincoln or search for Abe Lincoln in all documents.

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point at present, but Great Britain has her own modes of averting the danger. She seems bent on depopulating Ireland; on transferring her troublesome enemy to the Western Continent, and leaving no materials for insurrection at her own doors. Mr. Lincoln having already disposed of some seventy thousand of her Irish population, she has good reason to suppose that her future supplies will be consumed with equal facility, and that no miracle will raise their dry bones from the battle-fields of the South to come home and vindicate the independence of their own country. Between Lincoln and Earl Russell the buried liberties of Ireland have no chance of resurrection, if her people continue to be deluded into armed emigration to America. Their true policy is to remain at home, and await the hour and the men. In the event of future hostilities between England and France, the short distance that separates the two countries and the employment of steam will render a French invasion of Ireland
Lincoln has an interview with Thompson. --The British abolitionist, Thompson, is spending his time in Washington, dining with Seward, Chase, Lincoln & Co. An interview with Lincoln is thus described: George Thompson had an interview with Lincoln & Co. An interview with Lincoln is thus described: George Thompson had an interview with President Lincoln on Friday, which was satisfactory to both parties. In the course of conversation the President said, in reference to the emancipation proclamation, that the paramount idea of the Constitution was the preservation of the Republic, Lincoln is thus described: George Thompson had an interview with President Lincoln on Friday, which was satisfactory to both parties. In the course of conversation the President said, in reference to the emancipation proclamation, that the paramount idea of the Constitution was the preservation of the Republic, and that he had never for a moment doubted the right and the power of the Executive to issue such a proclamation whenever it was manifest that, like a patient's diseased limb, "life" could be saved only by amputation. Public sentiment had advanced President Lincoln on Friday, which was satisfactory to both parties. In the course of conversation the President said, in reference to the emancipation proclamation, that the paramount idea of the Constitution was the preservation of the Republic, and that he had never for a moment doubted the right and the power of the Executive to issue such a proclamation whenever it was manifest that, like a patient's diseased limb, "life" could be saved only by amputation. Public sentiment had advanced slowly but surely, and he had moved just as fast as it seemed to him he could move and he sustained. He could not have felt justified in the emancipation issue until all other means of restoring or preserving the Republic had failed, and he had no
The coming campaign.--all Dixie in fine feather. --A correspondent of the New York World, writing from Luray, Page county, Va, March 28, furnishes the following: The first days of spring find all Dixie in fine feather. From the fiasco of Kilpatrick and young Dahlgren near Richmond, from Mr Lincoln's shocking experiment in Florida, from Palmer's disastrous repulse at Dalton, and Sherman's magnificent fizzle, they gather glad auguries for their arms in the coming campaigns. While we are just entering upon a season of political distractions, divided councils, jealous Generals, voracious speculators, and a wrangling press, they bring to the struggle an united people, harmonious journals, and an army stronger than ever before, and eager for the trial of conclusions — stronger not in numbers perhaps, for it cannot exceed two hundred and eighty thousand of all arms, but in the stuff of which it is composed, in equipment, in supplies, in discipline, in tried leadership, and espec
Commutation of a sentence. --In the Northern news published yesterday it was stated that in the cases of Messrs. Scott, Kemp, and Dagan, who had been sentenced to death as spies, Lincoln had commuted their sentence to imprisonment for the war in Fort Delaware. This was very handsome in Abe, but his magnanimity loses a little of its lustre from the fact that the "unfortunate men" had already "commuted" their own sentences by escaping into the Confederate States, and are all three now in Richmond in our service. As a matter of reciprocity, however, we learn that they are all willing to "commute" Abe's sentence to imprisonment for life, handsomely giving him the choice between Fort Delaware, Johnson's Island, or any other of his numerous hotels.
Fared badly. --An officer in a New York regiment, engaged in the recent Florida fight, writes as follows to a relative in Buffalo: I have had my foot shot off and may lose part of my leg, all for being a delegate to the first political convention Abe Lincoln held in Florida.