hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 110 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 66 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 64 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 60 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 56 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 50 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 21, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Red River (Texas, United States) or search for Red River (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 1 document section:

with 40,600 men, had attacked the Confederates at a point on the Red river, below Shreveport, La., and had been entirely routed. The Yankee To understand the importance of the great expedition up the Red river, it is necessary to review the military situation in the beginninseasons had dictated this choice to Gen Banks. --For example, the Red river is only high enough to be navigable by the largest vessels duringarked at Vicksburg on the 10th and proceeded down to the mouth of Red river, where they found an immense fleet of gun bouts ready for the ascboats, started from the Mississippi on the 10th, and ascended the Red river as far as what is called the Old river, when we turned into the Atchafa lays, instead of continuing up Red river. We found it, for twelve miles, a deep and navigable stream. Touching the naval force ixtracting. Sherman's men, it seems, have brought disgrace on the Red river forces of Gen. Banks. They ought to be excused, for what with th